Final Reflection

Creating the blog was easy with WordPress with its simple features and with digital convergence, I was able to easily incorporate pictures, and audios from google images and SoundCloud by embedding them onto the blog. WordPress allows cross-platform and is accessible on mobile devices hence, leading onto Herr Stephenson and Alper (2013) idea of transmedia. In creating the audio section, I encountered a problem merging a video and audio file into SoundCloud which lead me into using multiple tools such as, incorporating Youtube, Audio Recorder, Movavi movie editor altogether to then convert into an audio.

Teaching is no longer the same and the outdated method is no longer suited in today’s digital world. (Prensky, 2001) With the abundance of technology at our disposal, students expect teachers to adopt a digital pedagogy. (Howell, 2012) Being a teacher also means being a digital curator and selecting the tools best suited to teach. There is a lot the digital world can offer to teachers and students however, not everyone has equal access and teachers should minimize the digital divide and bridge the gap. With plenty of websites, students and teachers are not limited to one source but instead open to endless possibilities.

Technology “strengthens interactions so we can always stay in touch.” Student from Prensky’s panel (2001). Technology encourages this interaction and information can be shared across the world however, teachers and students need to protect their digital identity and be aware of what is posted online. Teachers has numerous tools to benefit them in the classroom such as interactive smartboards and videos to produce, elaborate or incorporate into their lessons. Our lives have i been greatly improved and made easier with technology. Selwyn’s (2012) Technology has shifted students towards independent, student led inquiry modes of learning with teachers as co-collaborator. (Howell, 2012) Technology is not here to replace teachers but instead be utilized to support teachers in educating students with 21st century skills so they can be digitally fluent and prepared.

Image result for students
Figure 1. University students using technology

 

 

References

Greenspan, M. (2018) Digital World featured image retrieved from https://hacked.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/digital-world.jpg

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital pedagogies for collaboration & Creativity. Australia: Oxford University Press.

Prensky, M. (2001).  Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. Retrieved from https://www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky%20-%20Digital%20Natives,%20Digital%20Immigrants%20-%20Part1.pdf

Prensky. M. (2008, May 22). The 21st-century digital learner. Edutopia. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/ikid-digital-learner-technology-2008

Selwyn, N. (2012). Education in the digital world. Retrieved from http://ebookcentral.proquest.com.dbgw.lis.curtin.edu.au/lib/curtin/detail.action?docID=1016089

Ulster University. (2018) School of Computing, image retrieved from https://www.ulster.ac.uk/__data/assets/image/0014/104621/varieties/wide-2col.jpg

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Digital Fluency

 

Image result for Digital fluency
Figure 1. Digital skills

 

Audio link to SoundCloud

Transcript

What is digital fluency? Well to be fluent, you need to be confident, efficient and accurate and in the digital world, to be fluent, you have to have competencies with technology as if it was natural.

Today’s generation are “digital natives”, as described by Prensky (2001) and it is no surprise that they are fluent in the use of technology considering the vast amount of time they invest into technology and the technology at their disposal. From the moment children starts exploring, they are exposed to a wide range of technology ranging from interactive apps on mobile devices or learning through the television with shows such as Sesame Street.

Statistics from Marc Prensky (2001) shows that today’s students – K through college –have spent their entire lives surrounded by and using computers, videogames, digital music players, video cams, cell phones, and all the other toys and tools of the digital age. Today’s average college grads have spent less than 5,000 hours of their lives reading, but over 10,000 hours playing video games (not to mention 20,000 hours watching TV). Computer games, email, the Internet, cell phones and instant messaging are integral parts of their lives.

Students expect their learning to be fun and engaging with the use of technology in the classroom.  A student from Prensky’s panel (2001) said “Technology helps — it strengthens interactions so we can always stay in touch and play with other people. I’ve never gone a day without talking to my friends online.”

So how might teachers incorporate technologies in the classroom and produce students that are digitally fluent for the 21st century and meeting the demands of the job market? Starting from primary school, students learn how to switch on the computer and engage with interactive smartboards or engaging in narrative stories with Microsoft Word. Throughout their high school years, they further enhance their skills through research, using excel or spreadsheets to graph, present information in a variety of format, make presentations, writing blogs, essays, podcast and even learning how to search for information effectively through key terms or understanding which sources are reliable.

Technology is an integral part of our lives and can be incorporated into lessons to make our lives easier. Microsoft word for example is a great tool for writing so teachers can plan lessons for students such as creative writing, journals, letters, reports and much more. Creating posters can be done in a variety of tools such as Microsoft Publisher or Adobe programs/ Photoshop. Creating 3-D images or plans for projects can also be easily done on program such as Sketch Up and even Minecraft can be used for designing buildings. Being digital fluent means to incorporate technology in our everyday lives with ease and both teachers and students can benefit from incorporating technology to nurture students to become competent members of society with technology skills needed in the 21st Century.

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References

Digital Fluency. (2016) Digital skills Image retrieved from https://theclassroomkelpie.files.wordpress.com2016/04/consulting.jpg?w=295&h=295 

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital pedagogies for collaboration & Creativity. Australia: Oxford University Press.

Prensky. M. (2008, May 22). The 21st-century digital learner. Edutopia. Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/ikid-digital-learner-technology-2008

Spencer, K. (2018). What is digital fluency? Blog.core-ed.org. Retrieved 28 April 2018, from http://blog.core-ed.org/blog/2015/10/what-is-digital-fluency.html

What is the Digital World?

In today’s modern era, the demands for technology has never been higher and we are fortunate to be living in a “digital world”.  (Selwyn, 2012, p.1) defines the digital world as

“an era where the use of technology, in the lives of people allows for a greater living style.”

Looking at this, our lives revolves around the use of technology whether it be socializing through social media or emailing a colleague, teaching, or sharing things with friends and families within our personal, learning, or professional digital world. The digital world is limitless and the abundance of technology opens up many opportunities for not just teachers but also students.

 

Figure 1. Digital interaction

 

Figure 2. 21st Century Classroom

Students today are born into this era of technology and Marc Prensky (2001) refers to the generation of natural members as “digital natives” whereas some teachers as “digital immigrants” adapting to the use of technology.  It is unfair for students to be studying with an outdated teaching system as Prensky (2001, p.11) stated “today’s students are no longer the people our Educational system was designed to teach” so it is not surprising that today’s students think and process information differently. Technology has shifted students towards independent, student led inquiry modes of learning. Teachers now assume the role of co-collaborator. (Howell, 2012, p.5)

Students today expect schooling to be rich and vibrant with the use of technology like their personal lives. In this digital world, it is essential to be competent with technological use in order to meet the demands of the workplace, and functioning in society by doing tasks such as shopping online.  Teachers are expected to adopt a digital pedagogy to enhance, motivate and engage students in learning to better equip students with the necessary skills to succeed in the 21st Century through the use of interactive tools such as white boards, ipads, laptops and much more. Whilst technology has become important, the teacher’s influences remain vital and without teachers, the herd of sheep is lost without a shepherd.

Figure 3. Teaching assisting students

References

Emag (2018)  Technology in Everyday Life, image retrieved from https://www.the-emag.com/hubfs/Broadsoft.jpg 

Edudemic (2012). 21st Century Classroom, image retrieved from http://edudemic.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/21st_century_classroom.jpg

Insight (2018). Google G Suite for education security standards, image retrieved from https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Vmf_1K0riPqULW_-q6EPB_HkbppjCxUHJTVsY4ykAbZqPLCEAowvIknkqu1KvSP_UuUjVqflMGyqq9nQ7DgmP02EBishK33QCFNB=w1688 

Howell, J. (2012). Teaching with ICT: Digital pedagogies for collaboration & Creativity. Australia: Oxford University Press.

Prensky, M. (2001).  Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants. Retrieved from https://www.marcprensky.com/writing/Prensky%20-%20Digital%20Natives,%20Digital%20Immigrants%20-%20Part1.pdf

Selwyn, N. (2012). Education in the digital world. Retrieved from http://ebookcentral.proquest.com.dbgw.lis.curtin.edu.au/lib/curtin/detail.action?docID=1016089